Nature Photography by Martin Ryer

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I’ve spent an afternoon, an evening and now today with T073B – Male Transient Orca in Comox Harbour. The third time was definitely a charm! It has been an incredible experience sharing the waters with this magnificent creature, one I will never forget. 

Thank you to local Comox Valley resident and my friend Tanja Kerr – flickr.com/photos/84125642@N07 Eagles tend to congregate from time to time in front of Tanja’s home and when they do, she lets me know! My very own “Eagle Hotline.” I got some good shots today and finally two or more in one frame while in flight, though they’re not as tack sharp as I would like. I’ll keep working on it. The… Read More

…My goal today was to photograph two or more mature Bald Eagles fighting, either on the ground, partially or in full flight. I didn’t quite get that but I still had fun!  

This makes two months in a row now, April and May that I have been lucky enough to see and photograph wild Wolves. I’m getting closer and closer to “the shot” I want. I was pretty far out when I created this image before the Wolf ran off. That’s a good thing though, to know that it was not habituated or tolerant of human presence.

Typically River Otters are rather shy, this one though played on the rocks right in front of me for nearly 20 minutes. They can grow to 1.4 meters long and weigh about 13.5 kilograms. They have the longest lasting fur of the entire Otter / Weasel family.

I will start with a bit of a preemptive spiel. Normally I am very excited to share the specific locations that I paddle to, visit and explore in hopes that others can do the same or may be inspired to do so. I will neglect to do so this time. To some, it may be obvious as to where I was and it may not be difficult for others to ascertain, I’m… Read More

It was an honor to meet up with acclaimed Canadian Wildlife and Nature Photographer John E. Marriott in Calgary recently. I received a signed copy of John’s new book – Tall Tales – Long Lenses which chronicles his journey as a photographer. Check out John’s website here: wildernessprints.com

It’s been said that once you enter a natural environment, that it takes up to half an hour for nature to begin to restore itself and allow for one’s presence. As with any highly interconnected ecosystem and unbeknownst to us this is all subject to our limited understanding of the natural events that may already be transpiring. Photographing wildlife in this natural environment is challenging to say the least. There’s always surprises… Read More